5 Jobs to do before next spring!  

  1. Ensure your horses and ponies are the CORRECT WEIGHT- if they are overweight, now is the ideal time to do something about it. If they are carrying too much weight, they will be prone to laminitis when the spring grass comes through… prevention is better than cure! Having an accurate weight for your horse is essential so you can worm and feed accurately. Milbourn Equine Vets have a mobile weighbridge that can be brought to your yard if a group wish to have a weigh in! Please call us to arrange.
  2. Check your WORMING PROGRAMME meets the current recommendations: all horses and ponies should be wormed for encysted redworm yearly and tapeworm twice yearly regardless of their Worm Egg Count results. This is because these worms are not detected by WEC. Equisal Tapeworm saliva test can be used to identify whether your horse has a tapeworm burden and is available from the practice. Worm Egg Counts are run here at Milbourn Equine, with a result, Veterinary Advice on wormers and worm management usually the next day!
  3. Double-check your horse’s VACCINATIONS are up to date before the competition season starts. Remember that ALL horses should be vaccinated for tetanus every two years as this disease lives in the soil and vaccination will offer protection on the occasions when minor wounds could be a problem. Pregnant mares should receive Equine Herpes Virus (EHV) vaccinations at months 5, 7 and 9 of pregnancy as this virus is known to cause abortion.
  4. Take advantage of our competitively priced DENTAL work to ensure your horse’s mouth and teeth are healthy and any problems treated before the Spring. Horses are incredibly good at hiding severe dental pain – so often problems such as tooth infections and fractures are only picked up on routine examinations!
  5. Make sure your FLY RUGS AND FLY MASKS are clean and repaired if necessary, so that they are ready to be used as soon as they are required.

Katie and Howard’s Eventful Year

Our vet Katie has had an amazing year –

”After a fabulous eventing season with the incredible ‘pocket rocket’ TJ including 8th at Chatsworth 3*, 18th in our first 4* event (the highest level) at Luhmuhlen in Germany and 17th in the British Open Championships we headed to the prestigious Burghley Horse Trials – a real childhood dream!! It was just the most incredible experience from start to finish. I was certainly more excited than nervous and loved every minute being there with such a special horse – we achieved a personal best dressage and he gave me the most thrilling xc ride to finish clear and fast and very happy. He came out sound and full of energy for the SJ and jumped amazingly to finish 24th – such an amazing result I still can’t believe it!! Great to have Harriet Fairhurst by my side too taking great care of TJ and being nervous for me.

To cap my amazing season I have been shortlisted for the prestigious Horse and Hound Awards – Amateur Rider of the year. The winner is announced at their gala ceremony at Cheltenham racecourse which will be another exciting evening for me.”

Katie went on to win Amateur Rider of the year and we are sure 2019 will be even more successful for her and TJ.

 

Howard Newitt at the World Equestrian Games

Our Hawkhurst Clinical Director Howard Newitt was invited to be part of the FEI Veterinary Commission at the recent World Equestrian Games in Tryon, USA.

”The veterinary commission is responsible for the welfare of the horses including conducting the horse inspections (trot-ups) and ensuring that medication requests are within the rules. We also were part of the quarantine team assessing all non-USA horses during their 42hour quarantine.

There were horses competing from nations from all corners of the globe and it was a fantastic experience to see all of the different types of elite horses and meet people from many countries. The difficulties with the venue have been well publicised but we should consider that the organisers took the games on at short notice when the original venue (Bromont, Canada) pulled out so without them there would have been no World Games.

Many of the people working at the games are volunteers and if any of you get the opportunity to volunteer at a major sporting event, I would encourage you to take it as it will be a unique time to meet lots of interesting people and to get involved with elite sports stars.”

New Equine ID regulations

The government has recently introduced a new law that takes effect in October 2020 which requires all horses and donkeys to have a microchip. At present, all horses and donkeys need to have a microchip to obtain a passport but older horses may have a passport which was issued before microchipping became compulsory. For these horses, a microchip will need to be inserted before October 2020. This can be performed on a zone or standard visit at a charge of £31.50.

Competition Time!

Sync Equine is pleased to offer a complimentary free body assessment to Milbourn Equine Vets patients. It’s a unique test of the body’s physiology and has been recognised as a useful tool in:

  • Lameness investigation
  • Pain and behavioural assessments
  • Poor performance evaluation
  • Monitoring rehabilitation
  • Preventative care

The Full body assessment Sync Equine are offering to Milbourn Equine clients can guide the veterinary team during the next stages of the investigation. In around 90 minutes it takes to gather the data – you and your veterinary team can see the map of your horse’s physiology. It allows your vet to have a comprehensive picture of potential complex play between primary pathology and secondary compensation issues.
To be in with a chance to win comment on the facebook post, email Yogi Sharp yogi@syncequine.com (or come along to our client evening) and tell us why you’d like your horse to win.
The draw will take place during the Milbourn Equine client evening on 28th of November 2018. If you’d like to join Sync Equine’s technician Yogi and our Milbourn team there here’s the link to the event: https://www.facebook.com/events/262095667672496/

React To Colic Evening

Many thanks to everyone who came along to our evening Colic talk last night. Our vet Harriet gave a great talk on what to look out for & how to react to Colic, followed by a video showing what is involved in gastroscopy kindly provided by Boehringer who also supplied our lovely food. Lastly we finished the evening with a talk from Brooke, Action For Working Horses and Donkeys who kindly came along to tell us more about the great work they do. Along with a donation from Milbourn Equine Vets and the proceeds from our raffle we are pleased to say we can donate a whopping £369.52 to help towards the great work that Brooke does. Thank you to everyone for all their support.

Free Evening Talk – When It’s Time To Say Goodbye – 28th November

Although a difficult subject, euthanasia is something that we will all inevitably have to face as horse owners.  It is a subject our vets are asked a lot about so we have decided to hold an informative evening to discuss what to expect and the various options that are available to you.
Everyone is welcome. We feel that it can be incredibly helpful as an owner to think about your arrangements and find out more about the subject before the time comes so you can have a plan in place for what is inevitably an upsetting time especially if it is unexpected.
David Funnell from Cherry Tree Crematorium will also be on hand to provide some information for you.

Yogi Sharp and Sarah Holland-Villa from Sync Equine will also be coming to tell us more about their Thermography service which they are offering through Milbourn Equine to our clients.

Sync Equine will also be offering a complimentary free body assessment to Milbourn Equine Vets patients. It’s a unique test of the body’s physiology and has been recognised as a useful tool in:
Lameness investigation
Pain and behavioural assessments
Poor performance evaluation
Monitoring rehabilitation
Preventative care
The Full body assessment Sync Equine are offering to Milbourn Equine clients can guide the veterinary team during the next stages of the investigation. In around 90 minutes it takes to gather the data – you and your veterinary team can see the map of your horse’s physiology. It allows your vet to have a comprehensive picture of potential complex play between primary pathology and secondary compensation issues.
To be in with a chance to win comment on our Facebook post, OR email Yogi Sharp yogi@syncequine.com (or come along to our client evening) and tell us why you’d like your horse to win.
The draw will take place during the Milbourn Equine client evening on 28th of November 2018

You can find out more about Sync Equine here https://www.facebook.com/syncequine/

There will be food and drink provided and also a Just In Case Owner’s Plan for you to take home.
Places are free so please call 01580 752301, email hawkhurst@milbournequine.co.uk or Facebook message us to reserve your place.

 

Gastric Ulcer Awareness Month – October

Upcoming gastroscopy clinic!

The only way to definitively diagnose equine gastric ulcers is by gastroscopy.

What is gastroscopy?

Gastroscopy is the diagnostic test that involves passing a flexible camera down the horse’s oesophagus and into the stomach.  This allows us to see the inside of the horse’s stomach and look for any signs of ulcers.

  • Horses are sedated to reduce anxiety and stress
  • Takes around 15 – 20 minutes
  • Not painful

What are the advantages of gastroscopy?

Gastroscopy is the only diagnostic test available that is definitive for equine gastric ulcers.

  • Reliable and straightforward test
  • Distinguish between squamous and glandular ulcers

It is important to distinguish between squamous and glandular ulcers as the recommended management and treatment is dependent on the location and severity of the ulcers.

Take advantage of our gastroscopy clinic offer!

During our October clinics we will be offering one week’s free treatment for any horse diagnosed with equine gastric ulcers following gastroscopy.

First Timers £150.00 including sedation for horses being scoped for the first time

£200.00 for all other horses

Please note: Any medication or hospitalisation if needed will be extra

Scoping in your yard is also available by appointment – please ring for details

To book your horse in please phone us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Could your horse have gastric ulcers?

Gastric ulcers affect over 50% of horses1 and can affect any horse at any age.  There are two forms of equine gastric ulcers; squamous ulcers and glandular ulcers.  These two forms of the disease relate to the two regions of the equine stomach.

 

Squamous ulcers

The lighter pink, squamous region of the equine stomach sits above the darker pink, acid-producing glandular region.  In normal circumstances it does not come into contact with gastric acid and therefore has no natural defences against the erosive effects of the acid.

In some circumstances the squamous region does come into contact with gastric acid.  Repeated or prolonged exposure results in the formation of squamous ulcers1.

 

Glandular ulcers

The underlying cause of glandular ulcers is not well understood and is the focus of much study.  They are found in the darker pink, glandular region of the stomach.  The glandular region is responsible for the production of gastric acid and therefore has natural defences in place to protect the stomach wall from any damage caused by acid.   It is thought that glandular ulcers result from a breakdown in these natural defences, therefore making the stomach lining more susceptible to the erosive effects of gastric acid1.

 

Do you know the signs?

Although over 50% of horses1 suffer from gastric ulcers, many horses show only very subtle signs.  These signs are often difficult to spot and can include any of the following1:

  • Poor performance
  • Change in behaviour
  • reduced appetite
  • Pain on girth tightening
  • Poor body condition
  • Weight loss
  • Colic

 

Which horses have an increased risk of gastric ulcers?

Several risk factors have been shown to increase the likelihood of equine gastric ulcers:

  • Change of routine
  • Intense work2
  • Intermittent access to water1
  • Isolation1
  • Erratic feeding and feeding ‘concentrates’1
  • Travelling3
  • Box rest

If your horse experiences any of the factors above, any changes you can make to reduce the impact of these will help reduce their risk of developing gastric ulcers.  However, there are some circumstances where one or more of the risk factors are unavoidable, for example travelling to competitions.  In these situations please call us to discuss preventative treatments that may be suitable.

What to do if you suspect your horse could have a gastric ulcer.

If you’re worried about gastric ulcers in your horse, please phone us to discuss.

  1. Sykes BW, et al. ECEIM Consensus Statement – EGUS in Adult Horses. J Vet Intern Med 2015; 29: 1288-1299.
  2. Lorenzo-Figueras M et al. Effects of exercise on gastric volume and pH in the proximal portion of the stomach of horses. AVJR 2002; 63(11): 1481-1487
  3. McClure SR et al. Gastric ulcer development in horses in a simulated show or training environment. JAVMA 2005; Vol 227 (5): 775-777